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Plant Lists

This guide organizes, categorizes and provides information about plants from the Maricopa Native Seed Library.

Desert passionflower (Passiflora pentaschista)

Other common names:  None

Difficulty level (when grown from seed): Difficult

Arizona Passionflower plant   

Desert passionflower, by Danielle Carlock. 

 

Beautiful vine which supports fritillary butterflies  

TYPE SIZE FLOWERS GERMINATION CARE WILDLIFE BENEFITS EDIBLE OTHER CAUTIONS

Vine

up to 20'

Blue with white
(Jun-Oct)

Scarify and then soak the seeds for 24 hours before planting

Full or partial sun, low to medium water

Host for Gulf fritillary, Mexican fritillary, Variegated fritillary butterflies,

Attracts night flying moths

Fruits edible, but they MUST be ripe (turns yellow and falls off the vine)

 

Not generally available at nurseries

Dies to the ground during hard freezes

All parts are poisonous except the ripe fruit

Leaves have unpleasant odor 

May become weedy 

Recommended use in the landscape: This large showy vine has flowers that open in the evening, so consider placing near a patio, pool, or other area where it can be enjoyed in the evenings.

 

 

 

 

                                                           

 

 

 

Desert Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa)

Other common names:  white winnia, spinyleaf zinnia, dwarf zinnia, Southern zinnia (Spanish: zinia, hierba del burro) 

Difficulty level (when grown from seed): Easy

  Desert Zinnia in bloom

Desert zinnia, by Danielle Carlock. 

 

 One of the zinnias native to the Southwest, it makes a very good drought hardy ground cover

TYPE SIZE FLOWERS GERMINATION CARE

WILDLIFE BENEFITS

EDIBLE OTHER

Groundcover

1'X1'

White
(Mar-Oct)

 

No pretreatment; direct sow or scatter in Fall

 

Full sun, low water
 

Nectar, attracts butterflies, special value to native bees

No

Long bloom period

Recommended use in the landscape:  Fill in hot spaces in the landscape with this groundcover. Does well in rocky soils, and would look good amongst boulders or in rock garden with other drought tolerant species such as Chuparosa (Justicia californica), Salvias (Leucophyllum sp), and Penstemons (Penstemon sp).

For Further Information

Native North American Plant database, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 2020. Zinnia acerosa profile.

SEINet. 2020.  Zinnia acerosa profile.

 

 

 

 

Gregg's Mistflower (Conoclinium greggii)

Other common names:  Palmleaf Thoroughwort, Palm-leaf Mistflower, Palm-leaf Thoroughwort, Purple Palmleaf 
Mistflower, Purple Palmleaf Eupatorium, Boneset

Difficulty level (when grown from seed): Easy

  

Gregg's mistflower plant in bloom

Gregg's mistflower, by Danielle Carlock. 

 

If you want Queen butterflies in your yard, this is the plant!

TYPE SIZE FLOWERS GERMINATION CARE

WILDLIFE BENEFITS

EDIBLE OTHER CAUTIONS

Groundcover

2'X2'

Purple/blue
(Mar-Nov)

 

Direct sow or scatter seeds in the Fall

Partial sun, medium water     

Nectar, host plant
for Rawson’s 
metalmark

​butterfly,
deer browse, 
especially attractive to Queen butterflies

No

Can be grown in containers

Frost sensitive but comes back in Spring

Recommended use in the landscape:  Plant in mass to attract butterflies and plant where they can be easily enjoyed. Can also be grown in containers. 

For Further Information

Native North American Plant database, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 2020. Conoclinium greggii profile

SEINet. 2020. Conoclinium greggii profile.  

 

 

 

 

Hartweg's Twinevine (Funastrum cynanchoides ssp. heterophyllum)

Other common names:  Vine milkweed

Difficulty level (when grown from seed):  Easy

Hartweg's twinevine in flower

Hartweg's twine vine, by Danielle Carlock. 

 

Unusual vine that hosts Queen butterflies

TYPE SIZE FLOWERS GERMINATION CARE WILDLIFE BENEFITS EDIBLE OTHER CAUTIONS

Vine

Up to 15' 

White/pink
(Feb-Sept)

Soak seeds in warm tap water 24-48 hours
before planting

Partial sun, low water once established   

Host to Queen butterflies and apparently Monarchs (but only as a last resort)
birds eat seeds, provides nesting material

No. Poisonous

Twines on fences and other plants

 

Not generally  available at nurseries

Plants in this family are poisonous

Sap may irritate skin

May become weedy; recommend cutting off seed pods (you can donate them to the seed library if you'd like!)

Recommended use in the landscape: Plant against a wall or other climbing surface or near a shrub it can climb. If you mass them, the flowers will stand out even more and help butterflies locate them.

For further information:

Native North American Plant database, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 2020. Funastrum cynanchoides ssp. heterophyllum profile.  

SEINet. 2020. Funastrum cynanchoides ssp. heterophyllum profile.  

 

 

 

Snapdragon vine (Maurandella antirrhiniflora)

Other common names:  Roving Sailor, Climbing Snapdragon, Little Snapdragon Vine

Difficulty level (when grown from seed):  Easy

Picture of Snapdragon Vine  

Snapdragon vine, by Danielle Carlock. 

 

Dainty, easy growing vine that supports pollinators

TYPE SIZE FLOWERS GERMINATION CARE WILDLIFE BENEFITS EDIBLE OTHER CAUTIONS

Vine

Up to 8'

Purple or red
(Mar-Oct)

Direct sow or scatter

Full or partial sun, low to medium water once established   

Host plant for common buckeye butterflies; hummingbird pollinated

No

 

Does well in containers

Not generally available at nurseries

Dies back to ground during winter

Recommended use in the landscape: Since this vine is very dainty, grow in a location where it will be easy to view. Does well in containers.

For further information

Native North American Plant database, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 2020. Maurandella antirrhiniflora profile

SEINet. 2020. Maurandella antirrhiniflora profile.   

Southwest Desert Flora, 2020. Maurandella antirrhiniflora profile